betweenthebooks.com

text

Some thoughts on Mushrooms from the forest 2011 by Takashi Homma

Posted in 3.11,text by iseki ken on 2013-03-11

without comments

オンライン・フォトグラフィー・マガジンF-STOP MAGAZINEに掲載されたTristan Hooperによる展覧会レビュー記事を転載させていただきました。

(日本語訳は最後に記載されています。)

Online photography magazine F-STOP and writer Tristan Hooper kindly let us reprint the exhibition review article.

*************************************************************

Some thoughts on Mushrooms from the forest 2011 by Takashi Homma

Tristan Hooper

During the autumn of 2011, following the catastrophic events of the Great East Japan Earthquake, photographer Takashi Homma explored the forests of Fukushima prefecture. In the midst of the nuclear crisis Homma selected, picked and photographed various species of mushroom that were found to exhibit high levels of radiation and were as a result classified as unsafe by the government.

An exhibition of the photographs entitled Mushrooms from the forest 2011 was hosted by Blind Gallery between December 17th and February 19th, 2012. A book by the same name, containing further images was produced in conjunction with the exhibit.

The newly opened gallery is located in the Yoyogi district of Tokyo, just a few minutes’ walk from the JR station. The venue itself is the definition of bare bones simplicity. Fashioned from what appears to be a recycled shipping container, the narrow yet surprisingly accommodating space places the focus directly on the work displayed and leaves little room for anything else.

The images are framed simply and displayed without captions. The individual mushroom studies, which account for the majority of the exhibition, are juxtaposed with images of the wild and unpopulated woodland environment from which they originated. The various species of mushroom are photographed against a white background; soil and other debris are clearly visible clinging to roots and stems. The different types of fungi are incredibly distinctive. After viewing one or two they begin to resemble portraits. Each mushroom is personified by its individual shape, size and features. Some species appear in pairs, others in larger groups still. These organic subjects look especially foreign photographed in such a sterile environment leading one to make associations with medical study or post mortem examination.

In modern culture and especially ancient civilisation the image of the mushroom is hugely symbolic for a number of reasons. This varied iconography could instigate a number of different interpretations in terms of understanding Homma’s work. It is interesting to note that fungi have long been recipient to a range of conflicting emotional reactions. On one hand they are the fruits of nature, spawned from the ground and picked by many for food but conversely they are often regarded as a sinister, potentially fatal and toxic species.

To some the phallic shape of the mushroom represents fertility, however when viewing Homma’s photographs perhaps the most obvious association can be drawn from the fact that the typical mushroom shape is ubiquitous with the cloud form produced by an atomic explosion. Referred to simply as a ‘mushroom cloud’, this image has been and continues to be the subject of endless recontextualization and can be seen appropriated within advertising, animation, protest imagery and political propaganda. Indeed, this atomic association is in keeping with the works somewhat nuclear premise. The atomic explosion is the result of man’s destructive application of nuclear power whilst the contamination of Homma’s mushrooms is partly a consequence of man’s utilisation of nuclear power for energy.

Homma picked the mushrooms and photographed them on site within the forest using a portable studio. The strategy of extracting the specimens from their natural habitat and relocating them inside a white, clinical environment seems to reassert and punctuate the concept of man’s potential influence and power over nature.

Mushrooms from the forest is another example of a relatively recent shift in Takashi Homma’s practice. His previous work is notable in its depiction of modern Tokyo suburbia and its young inhabitants. Lately however his focus has been more directed toward nature.

In comparison to the great glut of imagery produced in response to the tragic disaster of 2011 and the subsequent nuclear crisis, Homma’s work is muted and quietly suggestive. When studying the mushroom photographs it is easy to be drawn in by the intricacy and strange beauty of nature’s design but if one considers these images in terms of their contextual significance it becomes more apparent that this is a body of work that is loaded with implication.

 

壊滅的被害を与えた東日本大震災後の2011年秋、写真家のホンマタカシは福島県の森を

訪れた。放射能被害のさなか、ホンマは様々な種類のきのこを見つけ写真におさめた。

そのきのこたちは放射能を吸収し、結果として政府から採取が禁止された。

 

展覧会が行われたのは代々木ヴィレッジ内にあるblind gallery。作品を展示する以外に

ほとんどスペースは残らないほど細長くコンパクトだが心地よいスペースである。

 

作品はシンプルに額装されキャプションはない。さまざまな種類のきのこが、土くずは

ついたままだが、白バックで撮影されている。きのこはそれぞれ信じがたいほどに

独特な形態をしている。

 

現代社会でも古くからの文明社会でもきのこのイメージは多くの理由によりきわめて

象徴的に扱われてきた。この変化に富んだルックスはホンマの作品を理解する際、

様々な解釈を引き起こす。興味深いことに、きのこは両極端な対立するイメージを

もっている。ひとつは地面や木から採取される自然の恵みとしてであり、

もうひとつは邪悪で中毒性のある生物としてである。

 

男根の形をしたきのこは繁殖力を象徴するが、ホンマの写真から連想されるイメージ

といえば原子爆弾などによってできる、きのこ雲だろう。その図像は広告や

アニメ、抗議、政治的なプロパガンダなどに使われてきた。原子力による爆発が、

原発という、ある種破壊的でもある原子力の応用結果である一方で、

ホンマが撮影したきのこもそれを映し出しているのである。

 

ホンマはきのこを発見したその場所で簡易スタジオをつくり撮影を行っている。

きのこをその生息環境から切り離した白い背景の上で撮影する手法は、人間が

自然に及ぼす潜在的な影響やパワーをより強く主張しているようにみえる。

 


「mushrooms from the forest」はホンマの昨今の作品の変化を示す一例である。

ホンマは過去に東京郊外やそこで育った子供たちを撮影した

重要な作品を残しているが、写真家はより直接的な自然にフォーカスしている。

 

供給過剰なほどに撮影された震災被害や原発事故の直接的な写真と比較して、ホンマの

作品は無口で暗示的である。きのこの写真について調べれば、自然がつくったこの複雑で

奇妙な美しさをもつ生物に関心を引き寄せられるだろう。だが、ホンマがきのこを

撮影した背景や文脈を含めてこれらの写真を見れば、このシリーズが含蓄と暗示が

こめられた作品だということがより明らかになるはずだ。

 

その森の「大人たち 」/椹木野衣

Posted in news,text by tomo ishiwatari on 2012-05-4

without comments

 

椹木野衣

その森の「大人たち」

ホンマタカシ「その森の子供 mushrooms from the forest 2011」展

画廊に入ると、奥に細長い空間の両側に、キノコとそれが自生していたと思われる森の写真が、たがいちがいに並べられている。突き当たりはガラス張りで、冬の早い日暮れ後に訪れたせいか、深く暗い森への入口のように見えなくもない。実際、被写体となった森は、原発事故による放射能の拡散で高濃度の汚染が見つかり、野生のキノコを食することが禁じられているのだという。

すぐに思いつくのは、キノコの形状と原発事故で空高く舞い上がったキノコ雲の連想だ。原発だけではない。過去、大気圏内で爆発した核兵器は、例外なくキノコの形状をしていた。キノコ雲と呼ばれるゆえんである。

いずれにせよ、あの震災以後、僕らはキノコを以前のように眺めることはできなくなった。なにしろ、キノコによる放射能汚染は桁違いなのだ。以前、放射線被曝の研究者、木村真三さんのレクチャーを受けたとき、チェルノブイリ近郊でキログラムあたり億単位のベクレル汚染が見つかったという話を聞いた。いかなるメカニズムかはわからないが、どうやらキノコは、放射能を特別に濃縮する媒体になっているようなのだ。

他方、キノコはかたちが男性器によく似ていることでも知られている。展示を見るかぎり、今回も、そのことは明確に意識されているように思われる。つまり、これらの写真の前に立つとき、僕らはそこに、「キノコ」と「核爆発」と「男性器」という、三つの異なる属性を重ねて見ることになる。

もっとも、キノコとキノコ雲の形状の類似が偶然としても、キノコ雲と核爆発の関係はそう簡単に片付けられない。核兵器を開発したのはまぎれもなく男たちであり、事実、彼らの支配欲や破壊衝動、戦争での敵の殲滅のために核は開発された。その究極的な破壊の結果が、かくもあからさまに勃起した男性器を思わせるのだ。たまたま、と思えるはずがない。

いま書いてきたことを念頭に入れれば、会場の入口に貼られている展覧会タイトル「その森の子供」に、なぜだか横線が引かれ、言葉の意味が打ち消されているのもわからないではない。震災以前、キノコは「その森の子供」だったかもしれないが、いまではもう、「その森」を汚染した「大人たち」による権力の崩壊の似姿となった。とうてい、もう無垢ではいられない。いわば、キノコは勃起した男根で森を陵辱する、恥知らずな男たちの象徴となってしまった。

にもかかわらず、かくも過酷な悲劇と汚染のあとでも、キノコには未知の領域が残されている。僕らがこの展覧会を通じて見抜かなければならないのは、実は、こうした象徴的な読解を経てなお、その向こうに残る「キノコとはなにか?」というストレートな問いだろう。キノコの形状をこれまで以上によく見て、森でセシウムを吸い上げる、その不可解で無慈悲なメカニズムへと想像力を充ててみることだ。

あるいは、さらに飛躍すれば、カメラの形状そのものがキノコのようではないか。あらゆるイメージを吸い上げて濃縮するカメラは、どこかキノコのように不定形で不気味な感触を備えて、ニョキッとレンズを生やしている。

 

PROFILE
さわらぎ・のい 美術批評家。
1962年生まれ。
主著に『日本・現代・美術』、『戦争と万博』。
近刊に『反アート入門』。

「その森の子供」書評紹介 アサヒカメラ 2012 3月号より

Posted in news,text by tomo ishiwatari on 2012-05-2

without comments

 

こんにちは!

今週は「その森の子供」の書評と展評をご紹介します。

今回はアサヒカメラに掲載された生物学者の福岡伸一さんによる書評を紹介します。

 

森とキノコ
凄惨なる事件の現場
評・福岡伸一 生物学者

 

森の写真。ただ樹木と草が映し出されているだけだ。そこには色鮮やかな花、林間を舞う蝶、あるいは梢を通う鳥などは見当たらない。だから森は、かえって不気味な印象を私にあたえる。まるで何か恐ろしい事件が起きた現場のような。

森の写真と交互に挟み込まれたキノコの写真。引き抜かれ、無機的な白い台の上に無造作にころがされている。根元には土や枯れ葉の破片がついたままだ。だからキノコは、むしろ非生物的な印象を私にあたえる。まるでその現場からたった今、発見された凶行の検証物のような。

さまざまなキノコのいろんな形をした傘は、まるで花のようにみえる。しかしキノコは植物ではない。植物の特性である光合成能力をもたないから。

キノコは、カビや酵母の仲間、つまり菌類に分類される生物である。キノコのほんとうの姿は、傘の地下に張り巡らされた長い菌糸。菌糸とは細長い細胞が連結したもので、これを木の根っこなどにくっつけて栄養を吸い取る。また菌糸から有機物を分解する酵素を分泌し、分解物を吸収して栄養にする。

彼らのもつ分解力と吸収力はとても強力である。森が落ち葉で埋まらないのも、動物や鳥や虫の排泄物や死骸がいつの間にか消え去るのもキノコをはじめとした森の菌類のおかげである。

キノコの生命力は旺盛だ。私は虫を探しに、山道をあるいていたとき、見事なキヌガサタケをみつけたことがある。みるみるうちにキヌガサタケは成長していった。ちょこんと帽子を被ったような先端のドームのすそから、網目状の白いスカートがふんわりとひろがっていくのだ。細胞分裂の速度を、目視で実感できる生物はキノコの他にはないだろう。他の多くのキノコでも、傘は一夜のうちに開く。

それがゆえに、つまりキノコが急速な細胞分裂の能力をもち、そのために素早く栄養を吸収する能力を有するがゆえに、キノコはもっとも敏感な環境変化の感知者にもなりうる。炭坑のカナリアのように。もし何か凶悪なものがその地域を広範囲に襲ったとき、キノコは生物としてもっともはやくその影響を受けるだろう。しかし動けぬキノコたちは、逃げることも身を避けることもできなかった。

つまり、私がこの写真集を見たとき、最初に感じた印象は正しかったわけだ。森は凄惨なる事件の現場であり、キノコたちは目に見えぬ凶行の、もっとも脆弱な犠牲者だったのである。

 

次回は美術批評家の椹木野衣さんによる「その森の子供 mushrooms from the forest 2011」展の展評を掲載します。

どうぞお楽しみに!

 

Takashi Homma: New Documentary Review by Prajna Desai

Posted in text by iseki ken on 2012-01-31

without comments

Prajna Desai, a writer and academic editor based in Tokyo, gave her review for Homma’s traveling exhibition “New Documentray” on the Fall 2011 edition of aperture.

aperture FALL 2011号に掲載された、Prajna Desaiによるニュー・ドキュメンタリー展レビュー記事を転載させていただきました。

*************************************************************

Takashi Homma is a top-order Japanese photographer who first came to wider notice with his 1998 project Tokyo Suburbia, featuring suburban developments and impassive young adults. The series was exalted for its reserve toward subject matter, won Japan’s prestigious Kimura Ihei Contemporary Photography Award in 1999, and launched Homma’s international career. Since then, his lens has ranged freely across waves, mountain peaks, Italian women, storefronts, and wildlife corridors in California, recently homing in on the split icon Tokyo/children.

New Documentary, which originated at Kanazawa’s 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art and was then presented at the Tokyo Opera City Gallery, is Homma’s first museum solo show. In Tokyo, six rooms displayed representative series, including Widows (2009) and M (2000–2009, 2010–11), as well as the film Short Hope (2011) and Reconstruction (2011), an installation of books containing images of magazine spreads and covers rephotographed by Homma.

Three major works chart Homma’s career from Tokyo Suburbia to the present. The first, Tokyo and My Daughter (1999–2010), which contains architectural exteriors, city shots, and a girl at varying ages, is a paean to vernacular and popular photography. Despite the title, the girl in the images is not Homma’s daughter—a mild fraudulence hinting at Homma’s position on photographic record as a sliding scale of meaning. The series deploys an archival format, interweaving rephotographed images of the girl sourced from her parents with Homma’s own images of the city and some of the girl. One view originally shot on an automatic device shows the same girl at a petting zoo. An overhead portrait of the sleeping child, legs thrown apart, captures the ero-romance of new parenthood. Another image, filled with mouth-watering color, shows her seated at a table, her fingers clasped around an empty glass jar. With very few exceptions, who shot what in this series is largely unclear. Amateur practice and professional facility blur together, though Homma’s trademark attention to creating visually comforting frames seems to prevail, an impression that results partially from the viewer’s inclination to attribute works in a series to one authority. But the converse may also be said: Homma sourced only those photographs consistent with his own formal proclivities— symmetry, centered subjects, and good-looking (but humorless) characters.

Regardless of the method, these pedestrian images of mundane things could be mistaken for parodies of a layperson’s grasp of photography. Even the images of Tokyo city in this series, which are certifiably Homma’s, are no less ordinary. One city view, for instance, shot from a commercial aircraft with the wing visible up top, is classic tourist photography. Another image, of a Tokyo highway, mimics the tendency of front-seat car passengers to shoot through the windshield for the vivid blue hue its filter imparts.

The show’s catalog further implies intent behind the “de-skilling.” The images are meant to look ordinary because Homma has a bone to pick: he wants to demonstrate that photography’s documentary prestige has slid away and now lives within this ambiguous realm of half-genuine document and half-invention. (Still, it seems reasonable to question an idea that, more than twenty-five years since it was first widely argued by critics, is now textbook knowledge.)

The second set of images is Together—Wildlife Corridors in Los Angeles (2006–8), a series with a far simpler message. Fifteen photographs, each paired with detailed text by Los Angeles–based artist Mike Mills, feature tunnels built under desert highways for mountain lions to commute between habitats. The dominant trope here is the trace after the fact. Sites in the photographs were determined by GPS data of mountain lions’ movements in the area.

 

There are long shots and semi-close-ups of the tunnels, views shot through them, and images of animal footprints in surrounding areas. While this is ostensibly a collaboration, Homma showing and Mills telling, the text does most of the work, while Homma’s images are weighted down by specific, repeating locations where mountain lions have crossed. Consequently, the images lack variety; one or two views would have sufficed where there are fifteen.

The imbalance between text and image is worth belaboring, not because art photography should be self-explanatory, but because Homma is wearing a cap that does not fit. Other work based on an archival format—such as Tokyo and My Daughter and Widows (both in this show), and Hyper Ballad: Icelandic Suburban Landscapes (1998; not in the show)—suggests Homma is not a natural raconteur, that he borrows good stories. It also shows how much the overall non-threatening quality of his work depends implicitly on the in-built elements of scene—chubby girl, pretty room, and interesting architectural shapes. In contrast, the Southern Californian desert in the mid-afternoon sun lacks comparable scene-setters. Here, the light bounces off the asphalt, and shadows, especially in the semi-close-ups, lend the desert brush the appearance of unsightly blobs. Poignant issue notwithstanding, this series is about as gripping as land-survey photographs.

Fortunately, Homma’s talent for creating a pretty picture out of a few strategic details resurfaces in the final room of this exhibition. Trails (2009–11) records Homma’s experience of accompanying a deer hunter on a spree. Dark, leafless bramble, bloody-looking streaks, and brilliant snow recur in every image. Ten large color prints, twenty more color prints divided across a diptych, and a set of small, acrylic drawings create variations on the themes: more or less bramble, fresher or more congealed blood, and smoother or rougher snow across which something (presumably the deer’s carcass) was dragged. The work in this series might not be exceptional, but it is not without some pleasure. Moreover, the textures, patterns, and tones stand on their own without a verifiable backstory, which seems absent by design. With the hypothetical dead deer nowhere to be seen, the visual puzzle—Is that really blood, or am I being had?—returns us to the issue of record and authenticity intimated in Tokyo and My Daughter.

A meta-reading of this issue and of the show’s title appears in the introductory catalog essay by Noi Sawaragi. Apparently, Homma’s work is trying to render photography’s mortality, or increasing superfluity. He is documenting its contemporary predicament, and in so doing creating a “new documentary.” Although the proposition of Homma as photographer-philosopher is persuasive as an idea, it materializes only in very few works, such as the early Tokyo Suburbia, an exception to the rule of thumb dictating the more typical Homma in New Documentary. The works here make up with familiarity, visual pleasure, or textual information what they lack in ideas, and are best appreciated by first reconciling to what they are––ordinary images made by an award-winning expert.

Takashi Homma: New Documentary originated at the 21st Century Museum of Contemporary Art, Kanazawa. The show was presented at the Tokyo Opera City Art Gallery, April 9–June 26, 2011, and continues its tour at the Marugame Genichiro-Inokuma Museum of Contemporary Art.
Prajna Desai is a writer and academic editor based in Tokyo. She is currently working on a novel.

「ホンマタカシ ニュー・ドキュメンタリー」展 倉石信乃

Posted in text by tomo ishiwatari on 2011-05-25

without comments

ホンマの展覧会への批評を紹介するコーナーです。第一弾は、『アサヒカメラ』 2011年4月号の展評’11のコーナーに掲載された、倉石信乃さんの批評です。

*************************************

展覧会はいつも自作の編集の手強い機会だが、写真家は賭けに出た。オーソドックスな回顧展を忌避して、退路が断たれたのである。アパーチャー版の写真集『Tokyo』(2008年)のように、アンソロジーとして作品を提示する可能性があらかじめ排除されたということだ。ハワイのノースショア、その海波を即物的にとらえた連作「NEW WAVES」(07年)が選ばれていないことも、展覧会の性格を規定した。本展では、写真作品に対する感性的な投射と受け取られるような直接的な痕跡はいったん遠ざけられており、ある迂回を経ることなしには、ホンマタカシの作者性は顕在化しない、そうした原則に貫かれている。

その結果、観者の眼差しは宙吊りの位置へと緩慢に誘導される。この美術館特有の迷路的な導線は煩わしい反面、そこに散漫な歩行的快楽を呼び込む仕掛けは、作品が誘う不安定な位置と同期した。こうした不安定さはまた、ホンマが仕掛けた巧緻のあとか、それとも時代の不可避的な要請の産物か。たぶんその両方が互いを裏切りながら作用して、珍しい個展が出来上がった。この宙吊りの意味を探ることは、少なくとも「日本の現代写真」を考える上では貴重な機会となる。

read more »

「落ちない流れ星・夏の思い出・朝青龍」

Posted in text by manami takahashi on 2011-02-28

without comments

過去にホンマが執筆したテキストを紹介するコーナーです。こちらは2003年に発行された、中平卓馬さんの展覧会*1図録に収められた文章です。

************************

落ちない流れ星・夏の思い出・朝青龍   ホンマタカシ

台風が来ていた。羽田空港のカウンターは乗客でゴッタがえしていた。
「あらかじめご了承お願いします。当機は悪天候により東京に引き返す可能性があります、そのさい鹿児島空港にて給油ののち東京に戻ります。タイヘンオマタセシテモウシワケゴザイマセン」
その日沖縄行きの飛行機が朝から欠航していた。なんとか1時間遅れで沖縄に向かった全日空89便は南に向かうにつれ大きく揺れ、その揺れは着陸のときに最高潮になった。真っ黒の雲に飛行機が突っ込む。前の席の子供が泣いた。ガクンと飛行機が地面でバウンドした。拍手をする乗客。レンタカーを借りてホテルに向かう、雨はやんだが風はまだまだ強かった。

ぼんやりとシンポジウムを観ていた。「写真の記憶、写真の創造、東松照明と沖縄」シンポジウムというにはあまりにも予定調和な内容だった。「写真というのは時間を殺す作業なのだ、そして見るヒトがそれを生き返らせるのだ」と東松照明さんの基調報告を受けてのシンポジウムだったが、それは第一部で沖縄の写真家が図らずも言った「東松さんの敬老みたいなもん」だった。ボクはアクビをかみ殺していた。

しかし我らが中平卓馬には“お約束”は通じなかった。しきりにタイトル「写真の記憶、写真の創造」を指さし「写真っていうのはメモリーとかクリエーションじゃなくてドキュメントなんだ。アメリカ語を使えばね」「それでアラキさんはどう沖縄を考えて来てるのか?」

などとアラキさんに詰め寄る。アラキさんは慌てて立ち上がり「きのう一緒に踊ったじゃない」――そうきのうの夜は那覇市内の民謡バーで中平さんとアラキさんは仲良く沖縄しゃみせんに合わせて踊っていた。中平さんはご機嫌だった。そんな中平さんを見てアラキさんは言った。「中平さんは落ちない流れ星だよ、ふつう流れ星って落ちるんだけど、このヒトいつまでも落ちないでグルグル回ってるんだよー」

read more »