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3.11

(日本語) Some thoughts on Mushrooms from the forest 2011 by Takashi Homma

Posted in 3.11,text by iseki ken on 2013-03-11

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(日本語) 3.11と写真家

Posted in 3.11 by tomo ishiwatari on 2011-10-19

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(日本語) 真夜中 2011 Early Autumun

Posted in 3.11,news by tomo ishiwatari on 2011-08-17

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Sorry, this entry is only available in 日本語.

Postcards of The Great Kanto Earthquake

Posted in 3.11 by iseki ken on 2011-06-27

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Hi, this is Ken Iseki, the Editor at between the books.

Introducing today is a book called “絵葉書が語る関東大震災 – Ehagaki ga Kataru Kanto Daishinsai (Seeing The Great Kanto Earthquake Through Postcards) published by Tsugeshobo in 1990.

After the Great Kanto Earthquake on the 1st of September, 1923, a lot of postcards using the photos of the devastation emerged despite the severe damage at printing offices. The postcards were sold in the city, some for charity and some for moneymaking taking the advantage of the disaster. Without any visual mass media back then, they also became the means to convey the desolation in Kanto areas to the rest of Japan*1.

The black and white prints were coloured manually and then colour printed. You can tell some have been exaggerated with excess smoke and flame.

 

Location Unknown – Fire smoke in the dark

Nijubashi Bridge

(Above) Kyobashi-Ku:  The massive cracks in Tsukiji

(Below) Kojimachi-Ku:  Hibiya Concert Hall before and after the quake

(Above) Location Unknown: Big cloud and smoke

(Below) Kyobashi-Ku: Kyobashi area surrounded by ferocious fire

(Above) Kojimachi-Ku: Fierce blaze around the Imperial Hotel

(Below) Kojimachi-Ku: The Metropolitan Police Department in fire and the building pre-quake

(Above) Kojimachi-Ku: Sukiyabashi area in flames

(Below) Nihonbashi-Ku: Nihonbashi area before and after the quake

(Above) Kyobashi-Ku: Ginza before and after the quake

(Below) Kyobashi-Ku: Yamashita Bashi Bridge area before and after the quake

(Above) Honjo-Ku: Ryogoku Kokugikan before and after the quake

(Below) Honjo-Ku: Azumabashi Bridge before and after the quake

(Above) Asakusa-Ku: Nakamise Dori, the Senso-ji temple precinct’s shopping street, before and after the quake. The fire is spread fast on the street.

(Below) Asakusa-Ku: The upper 6 floors of the 12-story building collapsed and the area turned into a sea of fire.

 

(Above) Asakusa-Ku: Asakusa Park before and after the quake and the elephant evacuation.

(Below) Crowd evacuating in confusion.

(Above) Kojimachi-Ku: Crowd evacuating to Marunouchi. Furious fire towards Nihonbashi and Kanda.

(Below) Evacuees around Tabata

*1 Reference  Kanagawa University Website - The 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake: Photo/Map Database

Ryuji Miyamoto “KOBE 1995 After the Earthquake”

Posted in 3.11,site trekking by iseki ken on 2011-06-1

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Hi, this is Ken Iseki, the Editor at between the books.

Introducing today is ”Kobe 1995 After the Earthquake” by Ryuji Miyamoto, which focuses on Kobe after the earthquake.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sogo Department Store – Sannomiya, Chuo-ku, Kobe

Mitsui Trust and Banking Building – Sannomiya, Chuo-ku, Kobe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wakihama-cho, Chuo-ku, Kobe

 

Meiji Life Insurance Building, Sannomiya, Chuo-ku, Kobe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sannomiya, Chuo-ku, Kobe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nagata-ku, Kobe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nada-ku, Kobe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sannomiya, Chuo-ku, Kobe

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nagata-ku, Kobe

(C)Ryuji Miyamoto1995/Courtesy of TARO NASU

写真集トレッキング第5回 Taishi Hirokawa “Still Crazy”

Posted in 3.11,site trekking by iseki ken on 2011-05-21

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Hi, this is Ken Iseki, the Editor at between the books.

Introducing today is “Still Crazy” by Taishi Hirokawa.

It is a collection of photos which were taken in between 1991 and 1994. A 8×10 large format camera was used to take these then 53 nuclear power reactors in Japan.

 

The Mihama Nuclear Power Plant in Fukui, 19 August 1993.

 

The Second Nuclear Power Plant in Fukushima, 24 October 1991.

 

The Hamaoka Nuclear Power Plant in Shizuoka, 23 October 1991.

 

The Mihama Nuclear Power Plant from different angle, 23 September 1991.

 

The Monju Fast-Breeder Reactor in Fukui, 19 August 1993 Monju – this plant was still under construction back then.

 

Hirokawa’s photos produce neither positive nor negative emotions. Rather, the simplicity of the scenery around nuclear power plants raises the issue to the viewers.

 

Other pieces of Hirokawa can be found here at his official website.


 

(日本語) ROLLS TOHOKU 3/31-4/3

Posted in 3.11,site trekking by iseki ken on 2011-04-26

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Hi, this is Ken Iseki, the Editor at between the books.

Kids are playing soccer in the playground at Watanami Primary School in Ishimaki, Miyagi. The area was heavily affected by the recent earthquake and tsunami. This photograph was not taken by a journalist or photographer – but by the sufferer him/herself.

This is a part of project “ROLLS TOHOKU“ led by the Photographer, Aichi Hirano.  He has given disposal cameras to those affected by the disaster and put together the photos taken by them on a website.

The images we have seen on the papers or internet are all shot by the media, from their point of view. This was also the case for most of the dreadful events from the past.

In this  ROLLS TOHOKU project, those affected shot what they actually saw, experienced, and encountered around them.

Everything, from the squashed house, kids playing soccer, dogs wrapped in a blanket, old lady at a loss, middle-aged men chatting, a city turned into a swamp, to the kids giving the peace sign is bundled into one place.

Middle-aged men chatting.

Dog wrapped in a blanket.

Half collapsed house.

Girls.

 

Photographs can have a wide diversity - whether they were taken by those affected or by the media, or from a subjective or objective perspective.

To be able to see the photos taken by those affected on the internet. This would not have come true without the technology of today and Hirano’s dynamism. A very valuable project.

The ROLLS TOHOKU 3/31-4/3 website is here.

 

 

二つの自由の女神像

Posted in 3.11 by manami takahashi on 2011-04-22

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The New York Timesの震災報道写真

Posted in 3.11 by iseki ken on 2011-03-22

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